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Tony

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I use a Orange PI PC and Orange PI 3 LTS.

On both I did install Armbian (Debian Bullseye), then Kiauh. On the OPI PC I tested a USB WiFi adapter/dongle (RTL8188EUS) as it does not come with its own WiFi.

The OPI 3 LTS has 8GB eMMC and thats big enough for me. It comes with onboard WiFi, 2 USB2 and one USB3 port.

The OPI PC is sold around ~€35 plus shipping and the OPI 3 LTS ~€44.
The OPI PC has 1 GB RAM no eMMC and a Allwinner H3 CPU, the 3 LTS 2GB RA, 8GB eMMC and a Allwinner H6 CPU.

In theory you could use any board, that runs Linux. On the Armbian web page you find a lot of supported board, but I have only those 2.

EDIT:

Links:
Armbian: https://www.armbian.com/download/?device_support=Supported
OrangePI: http://www.orangepi.org/
Kiauh: https://github.com/th33xitus/KIAUH

Bigtreetech has a new board with 4 or 8 drivers and the possibility to mount a Raspberry CM4 module or their CB1(Allwinner H616). But for their CB1 there is no armbian 😉

Edited by Tina
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3 minutes ago, Calvinx said:

why do you need an SBC at all ?

In theory you don't. Any machine capable of running Klipper would do, and I guess one with some sort of USB port to connect up to the MCU. So in theory if you had an old desktop/laptop kicking around you could use that. I suppose the challenge is the added complexity of going-it-alone or off-script. There are a lot of nice pre-made bundles for Linux-Kipper-Mainsail, Linux-Klipper-Fluidd (which target the PI) that you simply burn to appropriate medium and off-you-go.

There's also the issue of things perhaps being less neat (having a relatively huge machine attached to the printer rather than a dinky PI.

I'm sure most people will have found the RPI locator but just in case it is at https://rpilocator.com/ and basically tracks PI availability from stores across the planet. However, be quick, when a store does have PIs they go within < 30 minutes (unless the shop restricts sales to established customers).

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Perhaps something like the USFF buisness PCs might be an option if there's cheap avaliability locally. I had access to a stack of unwanted Lenovo and Dell PCs that ended up in a skip outside a friend's work (I suppose it's bad that they hadn't figured out how to properly dispose of electronics - but that works to my benefit so I'm not complaining too hard...) that are <1L in volume and don't take much power. Certainly not Pi price but if you come across one on sale it might do the job nicely. Probably would fit in the electronics bay underneath a v2.4 with some thought.

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I guess one word of caution (back to my point about old hardware) would be to check the spec (processor and firmware). Not so much from a capacity point of view (Linux can be fairly light) but more capability point of view. Like so many things, backwards compatibility has to be sacrificed along the way so some newer OSes (not just Linux) simply won't work on older hardware. Sometime you can work around things (different kernels or alternate distros) but that then can lead to other compatibility issues e.g. older OS might not have newer Python versions.

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Hi all

Thank you all for a very warm welcome is was very uplifting. We are of group in our early 80’s and are trying to brace new technology for the purpose of communicating and teaching our great grandchildren which we love. The biggest stumbling block we face is the terminology. We have watch hours of videos but the presenter talk so fast that we have to rewind to make heads or tails of what they are saying. It is the little things which are not explained for us to understand, we used two jam tins and a length of copper wire to talk to each other gowning up we did not know about internet connections and WIFI. Is there any where we can find the meaning or a full understanding of the terminology. We are building a voron 2.4r 350 X 350 and we are at the stag of selecting the control board. All the documents we have read points towards octopus and a raspberry Pi but the price is over the top as we have to say money from our pension. The octopus board is ok but the raspberry pi we have to buy a kit which is too expensive. We have picked a winner with this forum and i thank you

 

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53 minutes ago, Tony said:

Hi all

Thank you all for a very warm welcome is was very uplifting. We are of group in our early 80’s and are trying to brace new technology for the purpose of communicating and teaching our great grandchildren which we love. The biggest stumbling block we face is the terminology. We have watch hours of videos but the presenter talk so fast that we have to rewind to make heads or tails of what they are saying. It is the little things which are not explained for us to understand, we used two jam tins and a length of copper wire to talk to each other gowning up we did not know about internet connections and WIFI. Is there any where we can find the meaning or a full understanding of the terminology. We are building a voron 2.4r 350 X 350 and we are at the stag of selecting the control board. All the documents we have read points towards octopus and a raspberry Pi but the price is over the top as we have to say money from our pension. The octopus board is ok but the raspberry pi we have to buy a kit which is too expensive. We have picked a winner with this forum and i thank you

I'm building a V2.4r2 myself and just wait for the last parts to arrive. I did buy a Octopus Pro direct from Biqu (https://biqu.equipment). For me that was the cheapest option. I will use a Raspberry Pi4 with it as I am going to use the Bigtreetech(BTT) PI TFT50 as display and that uses the flat cable that only can be used afaik with a Raspberry.

But I use a Orange PI PC with a BTT SKR1.4 on my Switchwire and a Orange PI 3 LTS with a BTT GTR on my V0 (modded to a Tri-Zero 😉 ). So far I had no problems with these 2 boards. As I mentioned above, I run both with Armbian. IMHO Armbian is for those boards the best option, as you don't have to worry about installing any 'drivers'.

The RPI 4 was about 65 Euros, from the pi hut in the UK.

Edited by Tina
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This is what I am using for my 2.4r1. 

https://m.aliexpress.com/item/2251832613593278.html?html=static&gatewayAdapt=4itemAdapt

I'm also running armbian, admittedly it's more to setup than a normal pi.

I had to apply a custom dts overlay to get usb otg working and freeze the base install after. But it's been running great from the onboard 8gb emmc storage with only 512mb of ram

 

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4 minutes ago, Hahns said:

This is what I am using for my 2.4r1. 

https://m.aliexpress.com/item/2251832613593278.html?html=static&gatewayAdapt=4itemAdapt

I'm also running armbian, admittedly it's more to setup than a normal pi.

I had to apply a custom dts overlay to get usb otg working and freeze the base install after. But it's been running great from the onboard 8gb emmc storage with only 512mb of ram

IMHO the Orange OI Zero Plus2 is not as good as the Orange PI 3 LTS (https://www.aliexpress.com/item/1005003577312703.html). The Zero has a H3 vs a H6 on the 3LTS and 'only 512MB RAM vs 2GB RAM. And the 3LTS is only €0.01 more expensive 😜

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6 hours ago, smirk said:

In theory you don't. Any machine capable of running Klipper would do, and I guess one with some sort of USB port to connect up to the MCU. So in theory if you had an old desktop/laptop kicking around you could use that. I suppose the challenge is the added complexity of going-it-alone or off-script. There are a lot of nice pre-made bundles for Linux-Kipper-Mainsail, Linux-Klipper-Fluidd (which target the PI) that you simply burn to appropriate medium and off-you-go.

There's also the issue of things perhaps being less neat (having a relatively huge machine attached to the printer rather than a dinky PI.

I'm sure most people will have found the RPI locator but just in case it is at https://rpilocator.com/ and basically tracks PI availability from stores across the planet. However, be quick, when a store does have PIs they go within < 30 minutes (unless the shop restricts sales to established customers).

why run klipper when there are superior alternatives, alternatives that are self contained and dont require extra hardware....

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1 hour ago, Calvinx said:

why run klipper when there are superior alternatives, alternatives that are self contained and dont require extra hardware....

Pleaee enlighten us... What alternatives do you have in mind?
 

RRF is great, but Duet setups that can drive a v2.4 can be as expensive as an Octopus + SBC. There isn't as much documentation and community support for Vorons, which can make it tricky for new users.

Marlin works, but I can't agree it's better than Klipper. It totally defeats the purpose of building a machine like a v2.4.

SBCs aren't the only options, but offer a nice package, GPIO interface, good energy efficiency and tools like KIUAH help make it less of a hassle to setup. Also, you can use them for/from other projects, which is an added value.

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Guess that's the beauty of all this - it's a broad church with lots of room for expressing personal choice.

Speaking personally, I only came to Klipper through Vorons, and I do have to say that journey (with Klipper) had its major frustrations. My observation of early versions was that it is very much a developer product (in my cynical and light-hearted view developers are "odd" people, what they see as reasonable and simple is often utterly irrational and overly complex for "regular" folk).

However, Klipper has improved greatly over the iterations so much so that I've converted all my other printers to using it. Is it perfect? Absolutely not.

Are there situations where I would not use it? Yes, there's a limit to how much effort I'll expend so if Marlin was a simpler option then I'd used that.

All the options have their strengths and weaknesses. For me Klipper is a good mix of features, flexibility, [lowish] barrier to entry and cost which other options (e.g. RRF, Marlin, Smoothieware) don't quite match. [Naturally, I formed that view before RasperryPIs became more expensive than toilet-paper in a pandemic 🤣]

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@smirk

I have used RRF/Duet hardware since I went on the hunt for a replacement to the P.O.S. ramps boards, I first tried the v1 smoothie board, its interface was "rudimentary" to say the least and even worse was the support you didn't get from Arthur Wolff....

This led me to find the first ever RRF boards, yes more expensive but also vastly superior (although not 100% perfect even to this day) in terms of quality of hardware, ease of firmware set up, web interface, and text editor based firmware manipulation, long before klipper was even thought of. 

Combined with a warranty that is second to none in the industry makes it an expensive initial outlay but you have a much better user experience, you can connect to a Duet via USB and then either Wi-Fi or Ethernet and have a network connection up and running in literally minutes, then you can dispense with the USB connection, the board comes with firmware already on it, with a fully operational SD card and a preinstalled web interface that requires no SBC, no flashing and does not require multiple pieces of third party software to talk to each other in unison, being g-code based (to me at least it is very logical) you can manipulate the firmware very easily.

With the introduction of the duet-3 eco-system & can-bus four years ago almost unlimited expansion became a viable possibility, the 4 wire setup to the tool head has been a game changer, as klipper users are beginning to understand.

I accept that that could all be construed as the rambling bias of a Fan Boy which might be correct but for one thing, I am a mechanical engineer and I must understand how/why things work, to this end wishing to understand the "hype" that certain advocates of klipper who ardently extol its virtues led me to choose to setup multiple instances of klipper running on an SKR-Pro 1.2 & a GTR v1.0 boards (these boards were specifically chosen because they are able to run a forked version of RRF in the event I wished to diverge away from klipper again), I installed them on some printers that I already use as test rigs, so i could gain first hand knowledge of what the requirements were to be able to get klipper up and running effectively.

To say i was less than impressed was an understatement. 

So I will break it down into sections of how I personally found things

Firstly you look at the hardware requirement, the quality of 99% of the Chinese hardware is borderline at best, they are cheap for a reason because the tolerance factors of the components are borderline with little to no headroom to keep costs to a minimum, admittedly for the lower common printer end of the market the prices for suitable hardware is lower, but start going up into tmc 5160 range of drivers in the amount a Voron 2.4 requires and things start to get pricy, and then it can be problematic if warranty issues become a factor when dealing with a vast number of the Chinese suppliers.

Then we go on to the extra hardware (SBC) requirement (being especially problematic to obtain not to mention expensive in the current state our world is in) then add to that the SBC will usually have a particular power requirement that requires further hardware  by the time you have put all that together you are going to be not far off Duet costs with easier setup and an almost no quibble warranty..

Then we get to setup (and documentation) setup/documentation must be viewed from the perspective of the average non-Linux user who wishes to get into klipper as having little to no "Linux" experience, I have multiple Rpi 3b+'s dotted around my house and workshop carrying out multiple differing tasks from home automation to a standalone weather station and i run Linux on my HTPC, while I wouldn't consider myself a Linux expert I know just enough to be comfortable in a terminal to be dangerous. And yes I know there are various  pre-complied "images" available to be burned to get people up and running, I found those to be problematic and downright fickle, to the point that I have (more than once) personally observed the developer of one of those pre-compiled images advising people to not update their systems because he was entangled in a broken image  with no quick fix available due to being at the mercy of a piece of third party software that is required to get everything to talk to each other...

Then we get to the klipper documentation which for certain steps which are required to get things to download and update properly are plain missing from the documentation the way the documents advises to do it didn't work. (documentation is a theme as I would say that while extensive the DUET documentation is its weakest link too) I was into double digits of hours attempting to get klipper up and running and getting the control board to talk to the SBC but in following the documentation I couldn't get klipper to download all the required files and update itself properly, it took again hours of searching on YouTube watching numerous videos to stumble across one tutorial which actually mentioned the very same issue I was experiencing and lt led me to a differing set/combination of Linux commands which allowed me to install/update all the required klipper files, after that it was the time spent faffing about creating the actual firmware the control board needed to ran klipper and then again using which ever piece of software required to get klipper on the SBS and on the control board to talk to each other, And all this time is with me being happy to mess around in a terminal window, how frustrating is that going to get to a user with no Linux experience and how long is that going to take them to setup, wire up and successfully get to all talk to each other.

Remembering that with RRF/Duet hardware, all boards come with the correct firmware already flashed a web interface pre-compiled and pre-installed ready to boot, all that is required is to activate the wifi network via USB by adding the SSID/password via YAT/Pronterface etc or in the case of ethernet you can check via your router what ip it has assigned all of which can be carried out in less than 10 minutes and then you can log into the printer via any web browser via a computer or any mobile device

And next we come to Can-Bus, Do I really need to explain the provable minefield mess of spaghetti steps that are required to (maybe) get Can-Bus operational on klipper based hardware....

Can-Bus on RRF/Duet hardware comes pre-complied & pre-flashed, requires you to wire VCC/GND & Can-H/Can-L in the correct order and it all "just connects"

I am the laziest person on the planet so I actively look for the simplest and easiest way to do something, and im sorry but from experience I see that for the average first time klipper/Linux user, simple, easy, user friendly and Klipper do not roll off the tongue easily together.

Then there is the final and for me the most important problem with Klipper and that problem is not actually Klipper, the problem is that there is a provable toxic contingent of fan boys in the Klipper community who have been observed attacking and abusing people who dare to speak out about negative aspects of klipper and treat those who do not see Klipper as the "be all and end all" with derision, you only need to Ask Thomas Slanderer about his experience with the toxicity and abusive nature of certain members of the Klipper community.

I see great potential for Klipper if it chose to become a board(s) specific firmware and was to break free from being shackled to an SBC instead of trying to be all things to all men and if it was to integrate a piece of web control software,  this could make it user friendly to the same level as RRF/Duet is, the recent announcement of an agreement for klipper to co-habit with one of the main players in the Chinese control board market might just result in some form of board specific klipper setup becoming a reality.

Edited by Calvinx
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18 minutes ago, Calvinx said:

@smirk

I have used RRF/Duet hardware since I went on the hunt for a replacement to the P.O.S. ramps boards, I first tried the v1 smoothie board, its interface was "rudimentary" to say the least and even worse was the support you didn't get from Arthur Wolff....

This led me to find the first ever RRF boards, yes more expensive but also vastly superior (although not 100% perfect even to this day) in terms of quality of hardware, ease of firmware set up, web interface, and text editor based firmware manipulation, long before klipper was even thought of. 

Combined with a warranty that is second to none in the industry makes it an expensive initial outlay but you have a much better user experience, you can connect to a Duet via USB and then either Wi-Fi or Ethernet and have a network connection up and running in literally minutes, then you can dispense with the USB connection, the board comes with firmware already on it, with a fully operational SD card and a preinstalled web interface that requires no SBC, no flashing and does not require multiple pieces of third party software to talk to each other in unison, being g-code based (to me at least it is very logical) you can manipulate the firmware very easily.

With the introduction of the duet-3 eco-system & can-bus four years ago almost unlimited expansion became a viable possibility, the 4 wire setup to the tool head has been a game changer, as klipper users are beginning to understand.

I accept that that could all be construed as the rambling bias of a Fan Boy which might be correct but for one thing, I am a mechanical engineer and I must understand how/why things work, to this end wishing to understand the "hype" that certain advocates of klipper who ardently extol its virtues led me to choose to setup multiple instances of klipper running on an SKR-Pro 1.2 & a GTR v1.0 boards (these boards were specifically chosen because they are able to run a forked version of RRF in the event I wished to diverge away from klipper again), I installed them on some printers that I already use as test rigs, so i could gain first hand knowledge of what the requirements were to be able to get klipper up and running effectively.

To say i was less than impressed was an understatement. 

So I will break it down into sections of how I personally found things

Firstly you look at the hardware requirement, the quality of 99% of the Chinese hardware is borderline at best, they are cheap for a reason because the tolerance factors of the components are borderline with little to no headroom to keep costs to a minimum, admittedly for the lower common printer end of the market the prices for suitable hardware is lower, but start going up into tmc 5160 range of drivers in the amount a Voron 2.4 requires and things start to get pricy, and then it can be problematic if warranty issues become a factor when dealing with a vast number of the Chinese suppliers.

Then we go on to the extra hardware (SBC) requirement (being especially problematic to obtain not to mention expensive in the current state our world is in) then add to that the SBC will usually have a particular power requirement that requires further hardware  by the time you have put all that together you are going to be not far off Duet costs with easier setup and an almost no quibble warranty..

Then we get to setup (and documentation) setup/documentation must be viewed from the perspective of the average non-Linux user who wishes to get into klipper as having little to no "Linux" experience, I have multiple Rpi 3b+'s dotted around my house and workshop carrying out multiple differing tasks from home automation to a standalone weather station and i run Linux on my HTPC, while I wouldn't consider myself a Linux expert I know just enough to be comfortable in a terminal to be dangerous. And yes I know there are various  pre-complied "images" available to be burned to get people up and running, I found those to be problematic and downright fickle, to the point that I have (more than once) personally observed the developer of one of those pre-compiled images advising people to not update their systems because he was entangled in a broken image  with no quick fix available due to being at the mercy of a piece of third party software that is required to get everything to talk to each other...

Then we get to the klipper documentation which for certain steps which are required to get things to download and update properly are plain missing from the documentation the way the documents advises to do it didn't work. (documentation is a theme as I would say that while extensive the DUET documentation is its weakest link too) I was into double digits of hours attempting to get klipper up and running and getting the control board to talk to the SBC but in following the documentation I couldn't get klipper to download all the required files and update itself properly, it took again hours of searching on YouTube watching numerous videos to stumble across one tutorial which actually mentioned the very same issue I was experiencing and lt led me to a differing set/combination of Linux commands which allowed me to install/update all the required klipper files, after that it was the time spent faffing about creating the actual firmware the control board needed to ran klipper and then again using which ever piece of software required to get klipper on the SBS and on the control board to talk to each other, And all this time is with me being happy to mess around in a terminal window, how frustrating is that going to get to a user with no Linux experience and how long is that going to take them to setup, wire up and successfully get to all talk to each other.

Remembering that with RRF/Duet hardware, all boards come with the correct firmware already flashed a web interface pre-compiled and pre-installed ready to boot, all that is required is to activate the wifi network via USB by adding the SSID/password via YAT/Pronterface etc or in the case of ethernet you can check via your router what ip it has assigned all of which can be carried out in less than 10 minutes and then you can log into the printer via any web browser via a computer or any mobile device

And next we come to Can-Bus, Do I really need to explain the provable minefield mess of spaghetti steps that are required to (maybe) get Can-Bus operational on klipper based hardware....

Can-Bus on RRF/Duet hardware comes pre-complied & pre-flashed, requires you to wire VCC/GND & Can-H/Can-L in the correct order and it all "just connects"

I am the laziest person on the planet so I actively look for the simplest and easiest way to do something, and im sorry but from experience I see that for the average first time klipper/Linux user, simple, easy, user friendly and Klipper do not roll off the tongue easily together.

Then there is the final and for me the most important problem with Klipper and that problem is not actually Klipper, the problem is that there is a provable toxic contingent of fan boys in the Klipper community who have been observed attacking and abusing people who dare to speak out about negative aspects of klipper and treat those who do not see Klipper as the "be all and end all" with derision, you only need to Ask Thomas Slanderer about his experience with the toxicity and abusive nature of certain members of the Klipper community.

I see great potential for Klipper if it chose to become a board(s) specific firmware and was to break free from being shackled to an SBC instead of trying to be all things to all men and if it was to integrate a piece of web control software,  this could make it user friendly to the same level as RRF/Duet is, the recent announcement of an agreement for klipper to co-habit with one of the main players in the Chinese control board market might just result in some form of board specific klipper setup becoming a reality.

I actually see where you are coming from and agree that RRF is great, Duet boards are very capable and high quality, but Vorons are definitelly not enterprise level machines. They are very capable DIY machines, but they still are DIY projects, made for people who know their way around most of the basic stuff to tinker. Which is why I always cringe when I see people building v2.4s as their first 3D printer, but this is another issue and I digress.

I also agree that the community is far from welcoming. Discord servers can be a huge disservice, but you can't discredit the really great people that are there and do help a lot, especially the newcomers. And all for free.

I come from a computer science background and do know my way around Linux, so I guess I'm kind in on the other side of the spectrum where I like the challenge of getting CAN bus to work on Klipper and also getting the most hardware and printing capabilities out of my hard earned money. Even if it requires me to look into alternative SBCs, budget controller boards and whatnot.

And thanks for all the great info, I always enjoy picking up more knowledge and appreciate you took the time to add some great information to this community.

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@Calvinx excellent exposition on the virtues of RRF and Duet, certainly not a rambly fanboy. I don't disagree with anything you say (especially the state of Klipper documentation, as I say a "developer" product). Since I too am an IT person (and therefore probably a bit strange) I would also  agree with @edulpn regards the inherent complexity and expected (implicit?) level of knowledge required to get any of this working. Having said that, it's no different with from any discipline/activity it's only simple when you know how 🤔

Sadly, a lot of sites on the internet are less than welcoming (or as you say downright abusive). I have lost track of how many things I've joined and never gone back to because of the environment. (At the risk of sounding like a biased fanboy) it's one of the things I like about this forum, that it is friendly, supportive and populated by decent human beings (including  a fair share of grumpy old men) so is free from the abrasive comments and abuse you see elsewhere.

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That was a really good, informative post, thanks.

It's unfortunate that there is a toxic element in the community. Sadly that seems to be part of most, some worse than others. I totally understand Tom's sour taste from his build experience; there was no reason for that--he wanted to go a different way due to familiarity and sponsorship. Too bad a few people couldn't understand and accept that.

My experience with Klipper has been pretty smooth so far. But I went with a pretty standard setup and did a lot of research before laying hands on the boards. Even my GPIO power/communication setup just worked.

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On 8/2/2022 at 2:59 PM, Calvinx said:

Firstly you look at the hardware requirement, the quality of 99% of the Chinese hardware is borderline at best, they are cheap for a reason because the tolerance factors of the components are borderline with little to no headroom to keep costs to a minimum, admittedly for the lower common printer end of the market the prices for suitable hardware is lower, but start going up into tmc 5160 range of drivers in the amount a Voron 2.4 requires and things start to get pricy, and then it can be problematic if warranty issues become a factor when dealing with a vast number of the Chinese suppliers.

I understand your point, but if I compare the price of the Duet3 6HC + Duet3 Expansion 3HC, which I believe would be minimum needed for a V2.4, then I end up with ~€385 (plus shipping) for those 2 boards. I did buy a Bigtreetech Octopus Pro with 8 2209  drivers and a Raspberry PI 4 B for ~€140 incl. shipping (€72 for the Octopus Pro and ~€68 for the RPI from the Pi Hut UK incl. import VAT). If you buy 6 5160 drivers, for A, B and Z motors, that would add ~€80. For my setup with 2209 drivers, that is a difference of ~€225 from the Octopus Pro to Duet3.

Personally I had a bad experience with a Eryone board, where one of the onboard drivers broke. Therefore I dislike and distrust boards with soldered on drivers. and will not use them. But that is only my personal experience. 

So far I can say only good things about Bigtreetech, as their support was helpful to get my SKR2 up and running with Klipper. The 3 boards of them I use have not let me down so far with several 100 hours of operating.

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5 hours ago, Tina said:

I understand your point, but if I compare the price of the Duet3 6HC + Duet3 Expansion 3HC, which I believe would be minimum needed for a V2.4, then I end up with ~€385 (plus shipping) for those 2 boards. I did buy a Bigtreetech Octopus Pro with 8 2209  drivers and a Raspberry PI 4 B for ~€140 incl. shipping (€72 for the Octopus Pro and ~€68 for the RPI from the Pi Hut UK incl. import VAT). If you buy 6 5160 drivers, for A, B and Z motors, that would add ~€80. For my setup with 2209 drivers, that is a difference of ~€225 from the Octopus Pro to Duet3.

Personally I had a bad experience with a Eryone board, where one of the onboard drivers broke. Therefore I dislike and distrust boards with soldered on drivers. and will not use them. But that is only my personal experience. 

So far I can say only good things about Bigtreetech, as their support was helpful to get my SKR2 up and running with Klipper. The 3 boards of them I use have not let me down so far with several 100 hours of operating.

Factually with regards the duet hardware requirement to get a voron 2.4 operational is INCORRECT. 

The minimum required  equipment to get a Voron 2.4 running with genuine duet hardware (a requirement of 7 drivers) would be a Duet-3 min-5+ TMC2209 drivers (with the additional x2 driver board) which comes in at €153.72 (plus shipping) which by my simple mathematics skills is nowhere close to €385.00 this is a huge overestimation due to being uniformed about what is actually required to run a Voron 2.4

If you wish to have the convenience of RRF for an even lower cost that is a possibility too as there is an approved fork of RRF from team gloomy which allows you to run RRF on various  boards which employ the STM32F4 processor, for example the BIGTREETECH Octopus V1.1 which can be purchased for €57.00 but if you add (and can actually get them) TMC5160 drivers which when i just searched for now the cheapest i can find is €121.90 so that comes in at €178.90  (Or €91.95 with TMC2209 drivers) 

And if you want to go the route of TMC 5160 drivers on a Duet board you would only need the 6HC and a single 1LC toolboard which comes in at €278.09 again nowhere near the incorrect figure of €385.00 you are overestimating at the very least by over a hundred Euro's 

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