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@ralarock Voron 2.4 350 x 350 build...


ralarock
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Some background:

This is my first printer build and, therefore, I chose to simplify things to some extent by taking advantage of the PIF program (thanks for the parts Defib!) and I bought a 350 x 350 with Dragon hot end parts kit from Formbot3D. Unfortunately, I bought it at just about the start of Chinese New Year and had to wait quite a while before receiving it. They shipped and I received the kit within a few days of the end of C.N.Y. All good there. The Dragon hot end is shipping directly from China and I have yet to receive that.

I now have the bulk of the parts. So, here goes!

Formbot3D kit unboxing.

Thomas Sanladerer is my inspiration for this build and much of my experience will be compared to his. If I recall correctly, in his live stream build series he mentioned a few things that he found questionable about the Formbot3D kit he used. As best I can tell Formbot3D has addressed at least some of those concerns. In my kit:
The build plate is labeled as cast and ground aluminum with a tolerance declaration.
The servo motors all have connectors rather than wires.
There is a collection of wires set up with connectors rather than a spool of wire.
The hardware appears to be stainless rather than the messy stuff with the oily black finish.
 
I tried but was unable to attach a photo of the unboxed kit. Everything was carefully packaged. I'm impressed so far. All in all, at first glance, the kit looks really good. I'm looking forward to digging into it further.

 

Edited by ralarock
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The PIF kit.

I ordered a Dragon, Duet kit in the standard black and red. I was contacted by the printer, Defib, to confirm my specifications. Just in case I changed my mind about anything. I didn't make changes, but it was a very nice thing to do! After confirming the order, it was printed and shipped to me within a few days. A very smooth process.

The parts arrived in a box. The parts are organized into 4 bags. Each bag is labeled with a list of the parts inside. The package also included a packing label with the order information.

The print quality is excellent in my opinion. I have not started assembly yet and can't speak to dimensional accuracy, but everything looks flat and of excellent quality.

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I only have contact through the normal Discord channel. Defib is the person that did the printing for PIF. As far as I know the PIF volunteers don't do printing support. I have not tried it yet, but you might try the voron_2_questions within the VoronDesign Discord server.

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There are two, in my opinion, excellent YouTube resources for this build.

and

I used both as needed to help clarify things as I went along.

I built this jig from Adafruit to help my less than steady hands install heat set inserts: https://learn.adafruit.com/heat-set-rig/. I made one mod to it, adding a stop so that all the inserts for the same parts are at the same depth. This thing has made it much easier for me to install the inserts straight.

Frame assembly was quite easy. Be very careful to square everything up as you go. Nero 3D stresses this and describes how to go about it in detail. MUCH APPRECIATED!

Just so you are aware, the VORON 2.4 build manual leaves out some, what I am guessing is assumed to be obvious, basic knowledge. Like when and where to use T-nuts, for example. The drawings in the build manual are excellent. It's full of tips. I have been following the order as given.

Frame: I created a simple 3mm spacer for setting the slides at the correct height. I don't know that this is needed, but it helped me.

Sandwich: Nothing fancy. It just went together without a hitch.

Z-axiz drives and gear boxes: The PIF kit was organized so that all the parts for these assemblies were in a single bag. Nice! The mount plate uses a M5 nut. The holes for the nuts were a touch too large to hold the nut in place during assembly. I used a touch of super glue to attach them to the mount plate.

Build plate: I used water and  alcohol to clean the build plate before attaching the magnetic surface and the heating element. Thermal paste is needed to mount the overload sensor. I used a flexible squeegee to lay the surfaces down without bubbles as described by Thomas Sanladerer in his Part 2 video.

Z limit sensor: The manual states that it requires a 5x33mm pin. The BOM calls this out as 5x30mm. The Formbot3D kit provides a 30mm pin. I'm guessing there's a typo in the build manual. But, that is a guess. I may find out later I need to obtain a 33mm long pin. The Formbot3D kit has the sensor switch and connector mounted on this great little circuit board. It just plugs in and is attached with some small self tapping screws. No soldering or wiring required. Nice!

I have been using the model to examine what assemblies are supposed to look like finished when I found the build manual confusing.

So far, I remain impressed by the detailed information from the good folks at VORON, the PIF parts and the Formbot3D kit.

 

Edited by ralarock
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Don't forget Steve Builds:

Even their build series on other models are useful as a lot of the basic techniques and tips carry across all Voron builds. I watched pretty much all of their build streams while gathering parts and went into my build with a lot of those tidbits filed away.

Also, keep an eye out for the V2.4r2 manual to be released soon (some time in the next week or so). It should have a lot more information in it with lessons learned from the Trident manual. Things like where to insert T-nuts and which way to orient them.

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Gantry constructed today. A fun assembly without a lot of challenges. It's very helpful to have the model available for reference from time to time.

The Formbot3D kit includes hall effect x-y limit sensors both mounted on a small circuit board. It's a nice little setup. However the build manual makes no mention of this. It confused me for a bit as the PIF kit I purchased included the micro switch mount. A bit of research and I found the needed information here:

https://docs.vorondesign.com/community/electronics/120decibell/hall_effect_endstop_setup.html.

It wouldn't be any fun if there wasn't a challenge or two along the way, right? This mod requires printing a couple of parts. Which, because of my current printing limitations, I did using PLA. I will probably print the parts again from something more heat resistant later. These parts should get me started okay.

Next, the Afterburner setup. I'm using a Dragon high flow hot end. Which has not arrived yet. So, I'm in a holding pattern at the moment. I am not certain if the PIF kit includes the parts for mounting the Dragon. If not, getting the right mounting might be a challenge. Worst case I mount an E3D for now and make what I need on my nifty (soon to be) new Voron 2.4 then change configuration. We shall see.

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I also purchased the Formbot kit as my first build. It's all together and running well. I'm very happy with it. I went with the Dragon Standard flow and also waited a little for it. I have the Octopus V1.1 and my kit was for 300mm. I really can't complain about anything in the kit. The time and money savings are well worth any compromises I may have made by not sourcing it myself. If you notice in a few of the Youtube builds, they order a harness kit from Linneo instead of using anything from the kit. While I'm certain that would have been easier, it would add another $150 to the tally, so I'm quite happy with it as it is. I'm already mulling the idea of building a Trident soon. I may try sourcing everything myself this time around, but a little at a time. I'm in no rush, but I really enjoyed the project and I'd definitely like to do it again. Good luck with yours. Sounds like you're right on track.

Edited by PFDennis
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Finished the mechanical assembly.

The belts and installing the gantry were the most challenging aspect of the build so far because the build manual has sparse detail on this. Watching Thomas Sanladerer's Voron build series as he worked through basically the same issues I was experiencing helped a lot.

Gantry mounting:

The mounts require two t-nuts to attach to the gantry. I found I had to move the last bolt and t-nut holding the rails in place one hole over to provide enough space to fit the additional t-nuts. Tip: leave the holes at the ends of the x-y gantry rails empty when assembling the gantry.

Belts:

I suggest ensuring all of the belts for the z axis and x-y axes are exactly the same length before installation. This is easy to do by meshing the belt teeth at one end and sliding down the belt until the other end and checking they are the same. One belt will be offset by a single tooth. The Formbot3D kit belts were spot on. The belts are a bit longer than needed. Nero 3D recommended not cutting off the ends for the x and y belts. So, I tucked the extra in the space above the bed sensor.

Belt tensioning was fairly straight forward. Make certain to loosen the z axis idlers where they are attached to the frame so the tensioner can move vertically. I printed and used a handy belt tension measuring device. It's useful for ensuring the all the belts are tension about the same. Found here: https://github.com/VoronDesign/VoronUsers/blob/master/printer_mods/Kruppes/Tension_Meter/README.md.

Bed Plate:

I mounted the bed plate and followed what seems to be the most popular advice, using 3 attachment points and tightening only one fastener. The other two are lightly tightened. Hopefully the bed remains flat. I applied a bit of thermal paste to the over temp sensor.

Power mount plate:

PIF provided the Plug_Panel_Filtered_Mains (as named in the model) part. The Formbot3D kit included a power connector unit that requires the Plug_Panel part. As these will be mounted outside the heated part of the printer, I am printing them from PLA.

Next stop electronics.

Edited by ralarock
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On 2/22/2022 at 10:16 PM, PFDennis said:

I also purchased the Formbot kit as my first build. It's all together and running well. I'm very happy with it. I went with the Dragon Standard flow and also waited a little for it. I have the Octopus V1.1 and my kit was for 300mm. I really can't complain about anything in the kit. The time and money savings are well worth any compromises I may have made by not sourcing it myself. If you notice in a few of the Youtube builds, they order a harness kit from Linneo instead of using anything from the kit. While I'm certain that would have been easier, it would add another $150 to the tally, so I'm quite happy with it as it is. I'm already mulling the idea of building a Trident soon. I may try sourcing everything myself this time around, but a little at a time. I'm in no rush, but I really enjoyed the project and I'd definitely like to do it again. Good luck with yours. Sounds like you're right on track.

I am using Duet controls to provide some flexibility for a future project. I ordered a harness from Linneo. The lead time is 4 to 5 weeks (and I messed up and forgot to order it until a couple of days ago, sigh)! It is pricey, but I think worth it. I will use the BTT controls provided in the Formbot3D kit in the mean time. There's no way I'm waiting. I want to see this thing go! This is my first build and, perhaps, my opinion is a bit naive, but I think the Formbot3D kit is first rate. I am very pleased.

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After looking through the R2 update, I decided to adopt a three of the revisions. In particular, I prefer the new DIN rail mounts and other electronics mounting components. I also prefer the design of the revised LCD screen mount. I also like the idea of using WAGO buss connectors. So, most of the day has been spent printing parts.

So far, I have found very few things incorrect in the Formbot3D kit. One hickup is the end of of the Z sensor wires terminate in a 3 pin connector (only two pins used) and the hall effect PCB has a 2 pin connector.

Check clearance between the bed leveling sensor and the hotend. The clearance is minimal and if the hotend is installed the wrong way (I did this, oops) the hotend can contact (and no doubt eventually melt) the bed level sensor.

I am using a Dragon high flow hotend. I found that the length of PTFE tubing between the hotend and the extruder output is 25mm.

Installed the drag chains. I needed to flip one end over on the drag chains for the X and Y axes. I am using the R1 configuration for attaching the chains to the frame. This meant I needed to drill an extra hole in both ends of the Z drag chain.

Edited by ralarock
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The generic chains have the 3 hole mounts and those are in the STL files. I had them as well. I did not have an issue with the probe, however. Mine had a 3 conductor wire, which I used with the BAT85 diode. I ditched the Hall Effect for microswitches. It would only calibrate on one axis, the other was defective. I did have one issue with the drag chain. The Y-axis chain, when the side panels are on, rubs up against the chain bracket on the X-Axis as it rides front to back. I think that generic chain is a bit wide.

chain.jpg

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8 minutes ago, PFDennis said:

I think that generic chain is a bit wide.

It all fits so tightly together that there is not much room for play. I used the chains from formbot and they work fine, no rubbing. You can play with the whole gantry position on the corner blocks to get your clearance all around. Also, if the gantry extrusions are not fully butted in the assembly, you may have a slightly oversized gantry that would cause rubbing. My point is you may be able to adjust your gantry rather than buying new chains. 

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2 hours ago, PFDennis said:

The generic chains have the 3 hole mounts and those are in the STL files. I had them as well. I did not have an issue with the probe, however. Mine had a 3 conductor wire, which I used with the BAT85 diode. I ditched the Hall Effect for microswitches. It would only calibrate on one axis, the other was defective. I did have one issue with the drag chain. The Y-axis chain, when the side panels are on, rubs up against the chain bracket on the X-Axis as it rides front to back. I think that generic chain is a bit wide.

chain.jpg

I may end up ditching the hall effect X-Y end stops too. I have not decided yet.

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Wiring loom installed. The wires were clearly labeled and very easy to install. With the exception of the previously mentioned Z connector issue.

Drag chains:

Both ends on the largest drag chain, Z axis, swivel freely. For the drag chain to stand up properly, at least one end needs to be constrained so that it cannot bend back beyond the back of the drag chain. I chose to remove one end and attach the chain directly to the bracket. I cheated and used a zip tie. I will have to create some kind of bracket to mount it later.

The Formbot3D kit has a few, what I consider to be, relatively minor, flaws. The drag chain end not constrained. I was shorted some hardware. The Z sensor PCB, wiring harness connector issue. I think they used solid wire for the sensors and hot end harness. I don't know for certain, but the wire feels stiffer than stranded wire usually feels to me. That might become an issue after a while as solid wire is more likely to break with motion. I'm not worried about it because I ordered another harness I'll install later. Other than that, everything is fitting up well so far.

Edited by ralarock
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All the electronics and wiring are installed. There were a few snafus along the way that I created. One connection, the bed sensor port, had me confused for a bit. This is the sensor that is used for leveling the gantry relative to the bed. I had to get a bit of an education on where to find port numbers and how Klipper works with regard to defining ports. My system is running the BTT Octopus 1.1 main board with an PL=05N inductive proximity sensor. I used the wiring as recommended here: https://docs.vorondesign.com/build/electrical/v2_octopus_wiring.html

I found the port number required here:
866271459_BTTOcopusv1.1ColorPinoutout.thumb.png.2cc7ac7385dd239ca917b9404427487d.png

For my sensor and the recommended port on the Octopus it's defined in printer.cfg as: pin: ^!PG15

This can be found in the probe section of the config file. The "^" symbol indicates enabling a pull up resistor. The "!" character indicates that the logic is inverted because my sensor is normally closed. "PG15" is the port number. The Voron wiring diagram indicates using two different ports. The Octopus sensor port provides dc power. The signal port is PG15. Note that for this wiring configuration a BAT85 diode is required and MUST be installed in the correct orientation. With the black stripe on the diode closer to the sensor.

The BTT Octopus documentation states that the PROBE (aka sensor) port is designed for this purpose and does not require the BAT85 diode. I played with it a bit, but never managed to get it working. If anyone knows how to get this working using the Octopus sensor port without installing the BAT85, please share. I'd like to know.

Went through about 95% of the setup process as provided by the amazing folks at Voron. I fell on my face a bit at the last step when doing the extruder calibration. This is because I messed up and had the part and hot end cooling fans reversed. So, the hot end cooling fan was not running and that resulted in a clogged up hot end. I have not figured out a way to clean the thing out yet. Maybe pull out the heat break and use a torch or something. Not certain. I ordered a replacement heat break and hope that will resolve the  issue.

Other than the occasional cock up on my part, things are coming together. I should be printing in a couple of days! Awesome fun project.

 

BIGTREETECH-Octopus-V1.1-color-PIN-websize.pdf

Edited by Demosth
Added PDF document link as a download and an in-line image.
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Great post on the probe. That part had me looking between that image, the ugly green pinout image and the Voron Docs page so many times. I ended up with the wiring as specified in the docs website, but as an act of desperation since it wasn't working for me. Which turned out to be that I messed up the wiring even after checking it at least three times--swapped 0V and signal.

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On 3/3/2022 at 2:14 PM, claudermilk said:

Great post on the probe. That part had me looking between that image, the ugly green pinout image and the Voron Docs page so many times. I ended up with the wiring as specified in the docs website, but as an act of desperation since it wasn't working for me. Which turned out to be that I messed up the wiring even after checking it at least three times--swapped 0V and signal.

Thanks! I hope some of this is useful to someone taking on a Voron build.

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First print! But, I get ahead of myself.

Okay, so, I messed a few things up at the end that caused delay. The biggest two were: (1) something started causing homing the Y axis to have belt skipping which drove the X axis gantry out of alignment. Ugh. (2) I messed up placing the removable bed on the magnetic plate and it slightly covered the Z limit sensor. That caused the machine to crash in the Z axis. Which lead to a bunch of troubleshooting.

Issue (1): The belt started skipping after I began to resolve the crash. I assumed at that point that the frame may have bent. 4 steppers have a lot of torque. I took a few things apart, removed the gantry belts, verified everything was square and the belts not damaged, then put the mess back together. I did not find anything that looked as though it would cause the belts to skip. I did what we all would do. Go to the web and research. Try suggestions. Research more. Blah, blah. No joy. Sigh. I was pretty confused. Got a night's sleep and awoke with an idea. What's in printer.cfg for the X and Y drives? It turned out that the rotation_distance for the X stepper was set to 38 and the Y stepper set to 40. I have no idea how that ended up that way, but as I am the only one here, I must have fat fingered it somehow. Set both steppers to 40, realigned the X cross bar and all is well. Core XY printers really hate it when the two drives aren't moving the same.

Issue (2): the Z limit pin sits about 3mm from the bed plate. It does not take much of a goof up to cover it with a removable sheet of spring steel. That's what I'm going to tell myself, anyway. Cover that button and a major pain in the backside ensues. I plan to make some kind of stops to prevent a recurrence.

I'm up and running. Second print, something a tad more complicated than the first trivial test sample, is under way as I write this. I use Prusa Slicer. Currently version 2.4.0. It has a Voron base profile. I used that. I used the generic PLA profile provided with PS. Did nearly 0 tuning. Got an adequate test sample out first try. As I said, I'm printing a part now to see what happens. First thing I noticed is that it's about 30% faster than my Cartesian printer. I am starting to get enthusiastic!!!

I tried to provide some photos before and it didn't work for me. I'll try for a few later and see what happens.

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